Saturday, May 8, 2010

TOMBSTONE/MEMORIAL OF CORINNE ELLIOTT LAWTON - ALEXANDER ROBERT LAWTON PLOT - Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia







This is one of the most interesting tombstone/memorials I have ever seen and photographed. So much so, that I did a little research on it. A beautiful sculpture depicts Corinne Elliott Lawton, the eldest daughter of Alexander Robert Lawton (November 5, 1818-July 2, 1896) who was an important figure in Savannah's history. He was a President of the Augusta and Savannah Railroad, Brigadier General in the Confederate Army, politician and President of the American Bar Association.
The sculpture of Corinne Elliott Lawton (born September 21, 1846, died January 24, 1877), sits very calmly and majestically beside a cross. She is robed with a bare left shoulder. The sculpture is amazingingly detailed and well-maintained, with the exception of her right hand, which is missing its fingers. I suspect that some mean-spirited and heartless individuals vandalized this piece of art before the time when many cemeteries started getting serious about security and protection of tombstones. The pedestal is inscribed with the words: "Allured to brighter worlds and led the way." The sculptor, Benedetto Civiletti from Palermo, Sicily, was a noted sculptor in the 19th century. He was born in Palermo in 1846 and died in 1899. His piece was sculped in Sicily in 1879.
Turns out Corinne died the night before her wedding.
You can almost see the sadness in her eyes.

3 comments:

  1. This tombstone is absolutely most beautifully wrought. I wish all plots could be so beautifully memorialized. The cemetary where my parents lay doesn't allow tombstones above ground level... so sad

    ReplyDelete
  2. She did not die the night before her wedding. The facts are recorded in her mother's journals in the Georgia Historical Society in Savannah, Georgia. She died of yellow fever.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Burial records indicate she died of Nervous Prostration. The last yellow fever deaths recorded in savannah's 1876 yellow fever epidemic were early December, a month and a half before Corrine passed. But she wasn't getting married, didn't die the night before her wedding, and most certainly didn't kill herself.

    ReplyDelete